CD Release and Crystals-3

Dana Falconberry CD Release

These images were take at Dana Falconberry’s CD release party at the mohawk in January of 2010. I feel lucky to have been a part of the project! Here is an excerpt from the Austin American Statesman review:
“In a toasty living room in an old house next to a dilapidated motel in the middle of the 2,500-strong town of Hallettsville, Dana Falconberry and three of her friends gathered around their microphones one day in June and recorded for 11 hours.
They tore through 30 songs, recording most of the wispy, buoyant folk songstress’ catalog. Outside, in the still summer air, the cicadas chirped so loudly you can sometimes hear them on the recording, deep in the mix.
‘It was beautiful and spooky driving down these country roads in the middle of the night. You can see all the stars,’ Falconberry says . ‘So it was kind of like this magical trip to get there. And we pull up and there’s this inn that’s totally crazy and looked like the Bates motel. It was creepy, but it was perfect.’
The sleepy burg of Hallettsville — just down the road from Shiner and about 110 miles southeast of Austin — provided the perfect backdrop for the recording of Falconberry’s ‘Halletts,’ her spare, stripped-down second full-length album, for which she plays a CD release show tonight at the Mohawk.
Falconberry chose the unusual locale — the home belongs to the grandmother of friend and engineer Stephen Orsak — with an eye toward making a record that better captured the purity of her live performance. 2008’s ‘Oh Skies of Gray,’ the debut from the ethereal Austin-based musician, was an enchanting exercise in alluring folk that — with its lush production from Roy Taylor, a touring sound engineer for Patty Griffin and others who’d recorded such Austin acts as Glass Eye, Stick People and Craig Ross — sounded nothing like her live performances.
For ‘Halletts,’ Falconberry went back to basics, recording with a small band that included harmonizing vocalists Gina Dvorak and Lauren McMurray and bass from Andrew Bergmann. Six of its eight songs appeared on ‘Oh Skies of Gray,’ in remarkably different form — what sounded enrapturing but involving on the debut sounds simple and clean on Halletts.”
You can read the full review here: Austin American Statesman Article
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The images below were take at Dana Falconberry’s CD release party at the mohawk in January of 2010. I feel lucky to have been a part of the project!

Hallets Review in the Austin American Statesman

Hallets Review on TapeBombs